It is a globally agreeable fact that most of the content viewership is fast moving from the TV as a medium to the internet. While the television alone held its USP of live viewership until earlier, this year, now things have changed.

In April, Facebook introduced its “live” feature and was shortly followed by Twitter on the same. No one was quite clear on what this new feature will be used for by the masses. As it turns out, there is no limit to it. It started off with celebrities broadcasting to their fans (there have been quite a few news interviews as well), and now it has spread to what social media is massively contributing to- dealing with social issues.

Recently, a couple of incidents broadcasted on Facebook sparked quite an outrage. A profile by the name “Lavish Reynolds” broadcasted a live video of her boyfriend being shot by the police apparently for no reason. This highlighted the recent actions of the much debated US police. An example of how the spot news reporting can be changed? If the internet made everything faster and brought the world closer before this, going live certainly shoots everything through the roof.

The other major factor keeping the television alive is sports broadcasting. While platforms like ESPN and TEN have an online presence in that sense, it hasn’t quite caught on because of the convenience and comfort that TV comes with. However being available on mediums like Facebook or Twitter is a completely different thing.

In April itself, Twitter had signed a deal with the NFL to stream Thursday games. This could just be a pretext of what’s to come. This truly removes the necessity of being somewhere to witness something.

However, one can not completely ignore the havoc that this development could bring upon the society. Law and order can only be maintained if the enforcers are kept relatively under the radar. When there is fear of an unwanted online presence, everything becomes politically correct (wish someone teaches that to Joachim Low).

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