HU team to join NASA NExSS program to search alien life on exoplanets

Hampton – NASA has selected a team from the Hampton University to assist in the search by identifying the existence of alien life on exoplanets. Professor William B. Moore from the Hampton University will lead the team of the Hampton University, (HU) researchers for the project Living, Breathing Planet.

The project has received a grant of $3.8 million from an Astrobiology program of NASA and is an integral part of the space giant’s NASA Exoplanet System Science NExSS program.

According to Moore, the search for living worlds and life beyond the realms of the Earth will surely help in answering some of the most nagging questions about the alien life. Man has always been excited about the alien life and hence any research in this direction is followed with huge speculation. The team of HU will bring in all the expertise of the HU’s Atmospheric, and Planetary Service Department to carry out the atmospheric measurements and planetary science.

The results and the expertise of the HU team will be shared with the University, NASA partners and the relevant industry to enable better viewpoint while observing other planets around the stars in the universe. It will help the researchers from NASA and other scientists working in a similar direction in carrying out their quest for life on exoplanet with more confidence.

Connecting Top Research Teams

Jim Green, the Director of Planetary Science Division, NASA has said that the interdisciplinary endeavor will help bring the top research teams together. It will provide a synthesized approach to the investigation of the existence of life on an alien planet. Already the Exoplanet System Science or NExSS is helping NASA in finding out how life emerges and develops around the distant stars in the universe.

NExSS is also taking cooperation from three other researchers to give more speed to the project and unravel the mysteries of planetary bodies and their interaction in the space. Efforts are on to find out the reasons that could support life in the space.