Soon smartphone camera will come with health and food quality monitor

New applications for smartphone cameras is being found out allowing it to be integrated with a cloud-based system enabling monitoring of health, food quality and logistics. Scientists have perfected the first hyperspectral mobile device which can turn the smartphone camera into optical sensor which can sense food quality or human health. It must be remembered that hyperspectral cameras are quite expensive and is much sought for medical, industrial and space monitoring.

Now the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has perfected a cost effective optical MEMS or the Micro Opto Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) spectral technology, which is capable of a variety of applications for environmental policing, remote sensing and surveillance from vehicles as well as aerial drones. It is also finding wide applications in monitoring vital health parameters of individuals as well as ascertaining the quality of food.

Combining smart sensors with the web based sites will enabling 24 hours monitoring of health parameters like blood pressure, cholesterol levels, emergency procedures, checking different malignancies in the body, etc. It will also reveal in a jiffy if a particular food product is safe and edible.

Product verification can also be effected, and spurious and cheap imitation of premium products can be found out in an instant. The technology will also help in biometric identification helping the law enforcement officers to identify culprits without causing any nuance to the common public. The technology will also find application in autonomous vehicles and public transport systems.

The customized MEMS filter can be easily integrated into the camera lens, and the adjustment is synchronized with the smartphone camera’s image capture system. The spectral data can be used for image processing through various cloud-based services. Mass production of sensor technology will make the hyperspectral imaging in a wide range of devices in which cheap camera sensors are currently used.

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