Video: Nasa Curiosity Rover releases 360-degree view of Murray Buttes

Mars Mission by NASA: Mission extended for two years and Curiosity ascends to new Location on Mount sharp

NASA’s Curiosity Rover exploring Mars the fourth planet from the sun in the Solar system is bidding good bye to Murray Buttes which is the most scenic landscapes explored by it till now.

Curiosity rover is now on the next stage of Mars journey and will begin to ascend to Mount Sharp and explore new locations and find evidence for possibility of ancient water on Mars.

Curiosity rover has sent one last glimpse of its present location before leaving from here. NASA has released footage of 360 degree views of Murray Buttes captured by Curiosity before leaving the area. The footage has numerous images taken by the rover on the 1,451st Martian day of its Mars Mission.

Curiosity is a mobile laboratory sent to Mars by NASA that landed on Mars in August, 2012. Since landing rover has sent more than 180,000 interesting footages from the land of Mars.

NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover Looks Back on Murray Buttes (360 View)

Curiosity landed on Mars near Mount sharp and found evidences of ancient of rivers and lakes with favorable conditions for microbial life. Rover reached the base of the mountain in year 2014 and has collected rock samples from the buttes area and sent them to the internal laboratory for analysis.

The mission was given two years extension that commenced on 1st October and rover is now heading up to the new vistas of Mount Sharp.

The new destination is around two and a half kilometers ahead of the present location of curiosity. The new locations include a ridge with a cap of material rich in iron- oxide mineral hematite and a clay rich bed rock beyond that.

The mission is also monitoring the modern environment of the red planet along with finding ancient evidence of life on the planet. The mission is also monitoring the levels of natural radiations on the planet as NASA is planning a human crew mission to mars in 2030s.

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