Zoological Survey of India celebrates 100 years, 176 species found last year

As the Zoological Survey of India (ZSI) celebrates a century, scientists have discovered 176 new animal species in the last one year that preceded the remarkable feat.

K Venkataraman, director of ZSI, confirmed that a total of 93 new insect species, 23 fish species, 24 amphibian species and two reptile species have been recorded last year.

This has been one of the most exciting years for the Zoological Survey of India, which has contributed immensely to the overall list of animal species.

Venkataraman also said that 61 other species found elsewhere on the planet have been found and recorded in India. Among the insects, many were found in Bengal.

The list includes Agricnemis Kalinga found in Howrah, Onchotrechus dooarsicus in Buxa Tiger Reserve and Calvia explanata in Darjeeling.

Bengal, according to Dhriti Banerjee, deputy director of ZSI, has among the best diversities in fauna, due to varied climatic zones. More than 10% of all animal species recorded in India were found in West Bengal.

Zoologists also believe that Eastern Himalayas is the gateway to incredible fauna species, and, therefore, Darjeeling and parts or North Bengal have great animal diversity, especially with regards to insect and amphibians

Although, sad news also tagged along as many other species, including musk deer and Asiatic two-horned rhinoceros have become extinct.

Traditionally, ZSI used regular surveys and other ways of finding and collecting the specimen for its entries, but now they have also started using GIS platform. A digital program with a significant scale is underway.

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