Study reveals earth formed from tiny millimeter-sized asteroid debris

Lund University, Sweden – According to a new study, the tiny-millimeter sized stones that were earlier a part of the earth’s Solar System formed earth. The scientists believe that this cosmic ocean of particles was almost similar to what we now consider as asteroids. The study conducted by the Lund University in Sweden says that even now such fragmented asteroids land on our planet in the form of meteorites.

The composition of these meteorites includes spherical tiny stones known as chondrules. These chondrules are supposed to be the special constructing blocks used by the photovoltaic system. An astronomy researcher at the Lund University, Dr. Anders Johansen has said that the chondrules are usually of similar measurement and are slowed due to the fuel that orbits a younger solar.

These chondrules then are caught in the gravity of asteroids. Mordecai-Mark Mac Low, co-author of this study adds that once the chondrules are trapped in the asteroid gravity they fall down causing accumulation of sandstorm.

Mars was Formed in 3 Million Years

The study published in the Science Advances journal supports the earlier study about the meteorites from the Mars. According to these previous studies, Mars was formed by similar process in a long span of around 1 to 3 million years. This period matches exactly the time span, which the scientists have come up with using computer simulation.

Earlier the scientists believed that the formation of earth took place during the collisions between the protoplanets in a span of around hundred million years. Now, the researchers are keen to study as to how these protoplanets are formed. A co-writer of the paper and also an expert on chondrules from the Copenhagen University, Martin Bizzarro, has said that now it can be believed that the protoplanets were also formed in short span from the asteroids due to the trapping of chondrules.

The scientists are trying hard to find out the evolution of various protoplanets so that more information on the formation of the earth can be discovered.